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Getting your scratch on.

21 Mar
Happy kitty.

Happy kitty.

We love kitties. But it can be tough to live with them when they’re destroying your house. Previously, we looked at some ideas to help with inappropriate urination, which loses many cats their home. Another problem we see a lot in pet cats is destructive scratching of furniture, carpets, drapes, etc. This can be a frustrating problem. Who wants to have their new furniture destroyed, after all? No one. Hopefully this post will give you some ideas of how to discourage your destructive scratcher from scratching what you don’t want him to scratch, and instead turn his attention toward things that are appropriate for scratching.

The first thing to look at is what and where your cat is scratching. Does he like to scratch on a verticle surface (the back of your sofa) or a horizontal one (your carpets)? How high up does he scratch? What kind of surfaces is he seeking out? Soft ones? Rough ones? What rooms of your house? All of these things will give you clues to help you select an appealing, more appropriate option for your kitty.

There is a seemingly endless array of cat scratchers available in petstores and online. They run from expensive and elaborate cat trees to inexpensive carboard pads. There are carpet, sisal, and wood options. There are things that lay flat on the floor and others that sit at an angle. If you can imagine it, somebody probably makes it.

Cats scratch for a number of reasons. First off, it’s good for their claws. It helps them shed old claw coverings and keeps their nails healthy. It is also a good way for them to stretch their back and shoulders. And last but certainly not least, it is a way for them to mark their territory. Cats have scent glands in their feet, and so when they scratch on a surface, they are leaving their scent calling card behind.

Kitties in a kitty tree.

Kitties in a kitty tree.

Scratching is a completely normal and healthy behavior for cats. We just need to figure out how to channel it toward the right targets.

Using the clues you obtained by noticing what and where your cat is scratching, buy some things that you’d like your cat to scratch, and that might appeal to him. Take into consideration texture, and whether he likes to scratch on horizontal or verticle surfaces. Make sure that the surface is large enough for him to really stretch out while he scratches. Make sure your choices match his natural preferences. Many cats like rough surfaces that they can shred (so be sure you don’t get rid of a favorite scratching post when it’s well worn in!) If you have multiple cats, you will want to provide scratching options in multiple locations. Different cats have different preferences, and this will also ensure that there will be appropriate scratching surfaces available if one cat takes “ownership” of a certain item (remember that scent marking thing?).

Place your new scratching posts and pads in the locations where your cat is scratching. This is important. Yes, it might be unsightly for a while, but eventually you’ll be able to slowly move them to a more convenient place. In the beginning, though, you want to give your cat every chance you can to make the correct choice. You want to make the new items as welcoming and appealing as possible. If your cat enjoys catnip, a sprinkle of dried catnip or some catnip spray might be inviting. Do not try to force your cat to scratch on the new items. That could scare or offend him and turn him off to them. Let him find it on his own.

And to help him, you want to make his usual favorite spots less appealing by covering them with something like aluminum foil or double-sided tape. On flat surfaces, you can also use a plastic carpet runner placed pointy-side up to discourage little cat feet.

Again, this is not forever. When your kitty is happily scratching away on what you want him to be scratching, you can start to fade away the offensive things, being careful to monitor the situation to make sure that he continues to scratch where he is supposed to. Make the changes slowly and let him make the right choices a number of times before changing things more. With patience and perseverance, you really can train your cat to scratch only appropriate objects and not your new couch.

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Posted by on March 21, 2014 in Behavior, Cats, Training

 

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